automated welding equipment

What You Need To Know About Automated Welding Equipment

When you hear the word welding, you probably think of someone holding a welding rod and manually welding a joint together. While this is one type of welding, it’s not the only one available. Another option is automatic welding. To understand the differences between manual and automated welding, you first have to understand the basic process of welding. When you’re welding, you’re joining two pieces of metal together by melting them. Because of this melting process, we call this joint a weld. It’s not an easy process to learn, but once you’re familiar with the term and the basic process, you can understand automated welding equipment and the advantages each type of welding equipment offers you.

What is Welding?

Welding is the process of joining two or more pieces of metal using a melted, welded joint. There are two main types of welding: the manual process and the automatic process.

Manual Welder

A manual welder is simple to use and easy to master. The user controls the welding process, and the device itself does not control the welding. Each type of welding requires a different welding technique that requires specific training. Typically, a manual welder delivers the first arc that “seals” the joint between the pieces to prevent oxygen from entering the weld. Then, following a second arc, the operator passes the welding rod through the joint to melt the weld and join the pieces together.

TIG Welder

Tungsten inert gas, also known as TIG welding, uses a shielding gas, such as argon, to create a weld. TIG welding has become more popular in recent years, thanks to the increased complexity of metal parts and the growing demand for quality welds. Generally, to create a weld, the user first heats the metal with a torch. Next, they bring the torch’s heat through the shield and into the joint. When the torch cools, the user uses a special electrode to “punch” a second arc into the joint. The user then controls the torch to move the metal away from the weld and then controls the torch to weld the metal to the adjacent piece.

Gas Metal Arc Welding

Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) uses a single gas, such as oxygen or carbon dioxide, to create a weld. GMAW has become a popular choice for many welders because of its portability and ease of use. As with TIG welding, the user first heats the metal with a torch. Next, they bring the torch’s heat through the shield and into the joint. When the torch cools, the user uses a special electrode to “punch” a second arc into the joint. The user then controls the torch to move the metal away from the weld and then controls the torch to weld the metal to the adjacent piece.

Flux-Cored Welding

Flux-cored welding uses a mixture of metal powders and fluxes to create a weld. One of the most common welding methods, flux-cored welding is used to join a wide range of materials, including mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum. First, the user heats the metal with a torch. Next, they cover the metal with a shield, which protects the material from the flame. The user then uses an electrode to “punch” a second arc into the metal, which melts the flux. The user then controls the shield to move the metal away from the weld and controls the shield to weld the metal to the adjacent piece.

Robotic welding equipment

Robotic welding equipment is a type of automated welding equipment. With robotic welding equipment, two robotic arms move along rails, welding two pieces of metal together. Robotic welding equipment is becoming increasingly popular because of its low cost, efficiency, and ability to weld complicated pieces of metal.

What is Automatic Welding?

Automatic welding is a process that uses a robotic welding machine to weld two pieces of metal together. As the robotic machine welds, a heating element in the machine melts the weld, thus joining the pieces together. There are three main types of automatic welding: robotically controlled, robotically assisted, and robotically controlled assisted welding.

What is the difference between Automated Welding and Advanced Welding?

Automatic welding is generally a type of automated welding, but the two are not the same. Automatic welding involves a robotic welding machine, which is not the same as automated welding. Automatic welding equipment uses a robotic welding machine to weld two pieces of metal together, while automated welding is more along the lines of automated welding equipment.

 

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